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Is it true
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Colorado #5



Joined: 05 Jun 2017
Posts: 18
Location: Minnesota

PostPosted: Wednesday 6-7-2017 10:02 am    Post subject: Is it true Reply with quote

I have heard on the world wide web that when you're cooking with a DO once you start smelling the food you're cooking it is done.

Is that true or myth?
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bigfoote



Joined: 20 Nov 2010
Posts: 850
Location: West Jordan, Utah

PostPosted: Wednesday 6-7-2017 2:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very true put the lid on cook until you smell it don't peak it lets the heat out!
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Aggroman
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Joined: 01 Dec 2010
Posts: 1832
Location: On a river, somewhere in Texas

PostPosted: Wednesday 6-7-2017 8:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For me, it's very true. But I can't help but peaking a little. (Maybe it was those few times someone asked if anyone else smelled something burning.) Laughing Cool
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cphubert



Joined: 01 Jun 2016
Posts: 71
Location: CT

PostPosted: Thursday 6-8-2017 5:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not always, I am rotating the DO and lid (opposite direction) enough to smell the pot before it 's done. Bean hole cooking it is true but I always try to wait if I can but the smell usually has my stomach make the decisions. :Smile 1:
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Colorado #5



Joined: 05 Jun 2017
Posts: 18
Location: Minnesota

PostPosted: Thursday 6-8-2017 5:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very good statements guys. Thank you. I have never rotated my DO or Lid in the past and I'd sit there and enjoy the smells for a while before I'd take it off the coals. Now that I know I need to rotate every 10 - 15 minutes and it's done when I smell it maybe I won't burn it anymore....
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bigfoote



Joined: 20 Nov 2010
Posts: 850
Location: West Jordan, Utah

PostPosted: Thursday 6-8-2017 3:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Colorado #5 wrote:
Very good statements guys. Thank you. I have never rotated my DO or Lid in the past and I'd sit there and enjoy the smells for a while before I'd take it off the coals. Now that I know I need to rotate every 10 - 15 minutes and it's done when I smell it maybe I won't burn it anymore....


I used too but found that my breads and cakes baked just fine without turning the lid and oven opposite directions. Personal preferences. Do what what works for you!
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CWallyD
Pied Piper of Cast Iron


Joined: 30 Sep 2009
Posts: 622

PostPosted: Thursday 6-8-2017 4:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with bigfoote. I very seldom rotate the pot or lid. Good coal placement and let it cook.
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Brownie



Joined: 04 Nov 2014
Posts: 160
Location: NW Arizona

PostPosted: Thursday 6-8-2017 6:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Most of the time this is true. Sometimes it is a good heads up that what you are cooking is getting done too fast and you might need to remove coals from to top, such as when you are cooking a bread recipe.
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Outpost Jim



Joined: 24 Jan 2008
Posts: 505
Location: Canal Fulton, OH

PostPosted: Monday 6-12-2017 3:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I still rotate "quarter turn - quarter hour" especially when baking cakes & breads. It just adds insurance to proper coal displacement.
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Colorado #5



Joined: 05 Jun 2017
Posts: 18
Location: Minnesota

PostPosted: Monday 6-12-2017 6:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm headed to a cabin trip next week. Our D.O. menu that we want to try is Bread, Pizza, Lasagna and Baked Potatoes. I have never tired any of these in the D.O. before. Then Mountain Man Breakfast and Cobbler I have done many times over. However my son stated how cool it would be to have Pineapple Cobbler and it just now dawned on my we could try a pineapple upside down cake. I'm going to do some recipe hunting. Thanks for all the help guys. I'll be sure to report back how everything went when I get back on the 26th.
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ChadVKealey



Joined: 16 Nov 2015
Posts: 42
Location: SE PA

PostPosted: Monday 6-26-2017 11:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Colorado #5 wrote:
I'm headed to a cabin trip next week. Our D.O. menu that we want to try is Bread, Pizza, Lasagna and Baked Potatoes. I have never tired any of these in the D.O. before. Then Mountain Man Breakfast and Cobbler I have done many times over. However my son stated how cool it would be to have Pineapple Cobbler and it just now dawned on my we could try a pineapple upside down cake. I'm going to do some recipe hunting. Thanks for all the help guys. I'll be sure to report back how everything went when I get back on the 26th.


Lasagna is great in a DO. I'd recommend getting the no-boil noodles (a little more expensive, but a HUGE time-saver). Also, if you make your own sauce (or gravy, if you're Italian) or ricotta mixture, make them up ahead of time to minimize assembly on-site. Here's the recipe I used (just sort of ad-libbed, which is how I've always made lasagna):

Noodles:
1 box (8 oz.) no-boil lasagna noodles

Sauce:
1 28 oz. can crushed tomatoes
1 15 oz. can petite diced tomatoes
1 6 oz. can Italian-style tomato paste
2 tablespoons minced garlic (about 3 good-sized cloves)
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
2 teaspoons Italian seasoning

Cheese mixture:
1 15 oz. tub whole milk ricotta
1 cup shredded mozarella
1/2 cup shredded parmesan (or pecorino romano or asagio...pretty much any hard, sharp, Italian cheese)
1/2 teaspoon granulated garlic
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 tablespoon fresh basil (or 1 teaspoon dried, but fresh is better)

Topping:
1 cup shredded mozarella
1/4 cup shredded parmesan (or pecorino romano or asagio...pretty much any hard, sharp, Italian cheese)
1 teaspoon Italian seasoning

NOTE: If your DO is cast iron and relatively new, I'd strongly recommend lining with aluminum foil or buying those pre-made foil liners. Tomato sauce is very acidic and can do a number on the DO's seasoning layer if it's not very thick.

Oh, and back to the original topic, in my experience it depends on what you're cooking. In practice, when I smell what I'm cooking, I crack the lid to check the browning (if it's something that requires it, like cobbler, bread or biscuits) and the adjust the coals on top as needed. Usually that means moving some from underneath to the lid, or adding some freshly lit coals to the lid to get the color right.
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Colorado #5



Joined: 05 Jun 2017
Posts: 18
Location: Minnesota

PostPosted: Monday 6-26-2017 12:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That sounds good Chad. We'll have to try that next time. The one we made last week included a spice that everybody didn't like. So it wasn't as big a hit as it could have been. The pizza was so so. The garlic bread rolls were good. Mountain man breakfast is always good. Baked potatoes were a little underdone. The pineapple upside down cake was awesome. That turned out perfect.

I bit the bullet and bought those parchment liners by Lodge and those were awesome. Clean up was so much easier. But now I know how to make my own.

I have pictures if I can figure out how to post them. [/img]
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jakeway



Joined: 28 Jan 2015
Posts: 131
Location: Near Nashville, TN

PostPosted: Wednesday 6-28-2017 9:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Colorado, I love your avatar.

I wonder how many people actually know what a Colorado #5 is.
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Colorado #5



Joined: 05 Jun 2017
Posts: 18
Location: Minnesota

PostPosted: Wednesday 6-28-2017 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jakeway wrote:
Colorado, I love your avatar.

I wonder how many people actually know what a Colorado #5 is.


In a Dutch Oven/Cast Iron Cooking forum probably not too many. LOL... The fishing forums I'm on get it.

Thanks Jakeway...
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FFdoug



Joined: 20 Jan 2013
Posts: 108
Location: Maquoketa, Ia.

PostPosted: Saturday 7-1-2017 5:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I turn the lid in time, like Outpost Jim. But I keep track of the thin side, or tagged side of the lid loop. I use that like a clock hand. I usually start at 3, and work my way clockwise.
And yes, when you smell it, it almost done. I call that the "biscuit barometer". When you smell the biscuits, remove the heat. The oven will finish cooking all by itself.
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