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How far along is your garden?
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wolfy



Joined: 01 Dec 2007
Posts: 832
Location: NE Nebraska

PostPosted: Tuesday 5-19-2015 4:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Haven't planted anything yet....it frosted here last night! Thinking
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Bigbamaboy



Joined: 28 May 2014
Posts: 102
Location: N.E. Alabama

PostPosted: Wednesday 5-20-2015 1:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's still been dropping into the 50's here.

With this recent rain and warm days though, things are really growing. My cantaloupes are up as of this morning and my corn is about 3" high.
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Zelix



Joined: 24 Sep 2008
Posts: 912

PostPosted: Friday 5-22-2015 6:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My tomato plants are about 4 ft high now. I have tomatoes on the vine at this point. My pepper plants got attacked and are struggling. My herb garden is out of control. I have to get out there and work the garden over good this weekend.
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Bigbamaboy



Joined: 28 May 2014
Posts: 102
Location: N.E. Alabama

PostPosted: Saturday 5-30-2015 8:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mine is now making steady progress. It's been unseasonably cool for this time of year, especially for Alabama. It has been in the 50s at night and the 70s during the day. It's finally warming up and we've had steady rain. I have zucchini plants blooming and cayenne peppers almost ready. Bell peppers are putting on and my green beans are growing like crazy.


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HistoricFoodie



Joined: 18 Apr 2015
Posts: 88
Location: Central Kentucy: Where the Bluegrass Meets The Mountains

PostPosted: Saturday 5-30-2015 10:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It finally dried up enough that we got the new patch turned, and planting started.

In the ground are the onions, 5 varieties of tomatoes, 3 peppers, and the Fife Creek okra. Put out three segregated containers with the South African Gem squash I'm growing for seed.

Also put in a whole new herb garden, just for the landowner. My herbs continue at the house.

Still to go are the cukes, beans, black peanuts, and the Kentucky Flat Tan field pumpkin. Time allowing, I want to put in some Sicilian flat gourds as well.

Been raining the past few days, so it'll probably be next week before everything is in. Then I can start thinking about the fall crops.
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Bigbamaboy



Joined: 28 May 2014
Posts: 102
Location: N.E. Alabama

PostPosted: Saturday 5-30-2015 12:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

HistoricFoodie wrote:
It finally dried up enough that we got the new patch turned, and planting started.

In the ground are the onions, 5 varieties of tomatoes, 3 peppers, and the Fife Creek okra. Put out three segregated containers with the South African Gem squash I'm growing for seed.

Also put in a whole new herb garden, just for the landowner. My herbs continue at the house.

Still to go are the cukes, beans, black peanuts, and the Kentucky Flat Tan field pumpkin. Time allowing, I want to put in some Sicilian flat gourds as well.

Been raining the past few days, so it'll probably be next week before everything is in. Then I can start thinking about the fall crops.


Tell me more about your okra and squash you mentioned. I'm not familiar with either.
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HistoricFoodie



Joined: 18 Apr 2015
Posts: 88
Location: Central Kentucy: Where the Bluegrass Meets The Mountains

PostPosted: Saturday 5-30-2015 8:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I only grow heirloom veggies, Bigbamaboy, most of which Iíve collected myself. While there are rare exceptions, almost everything I grow is Appalachian in background---which, essentially, means s the entire Southeast with the exception of Florida. Many of them are relatively unknown, even among serious heirlooms collectors.

Fife-Creek Okra has a long story behind it. But, in brief, in 1890 a Creek woman visited with the Fyfe family in southern Mississippi. She left seed for this okra behind as a parting gift, and the family and its branches have been growing it ever since. Visually, itís related to the Texas Longhorn, and has the property of growing as much as eight or nine inches long while still being tender.

Gem Squash comes from South Africa where it is among the favorite veggies of the Cape Malay people. It resembles a round zucchini (and may be the precursor to those), but is generally grown as a hard-shell squash. Seed outside of Africa is very rare, but I discovered a domestic source while researching Cape Malay foodways.
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Tom Kurth



Joined: 19 Nov 2007
Posts: 239
Location: Alma, Mo

PostPosted: Sunday 5-31-2015 5:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

HF, Find it interesting that you grow Appalachian heirlooms. One of my brothers has much interest in and is well self-educated in horticulture. I introduced him to 'Brandywine' heirloom tomatoes many years ago. I was living here in central MO; he in eastern Iowa. We both grew them for flavor, but he always had better production. His comment was that the climate in Davenport must be nearer to that where the Brandywine strain originated. Knowing you live in Kentucky, it makes perfect sense to me that Appalachian varieties are appropriate to your use.

A lot of people don't make that connection: It obviously doesn't make sense to take vegetables bred in and for the cool, humid Pacific Northwest and try to grow them in hot and dry western Plains.
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HistoricFoodie



Joined: 18 Apr 2015
Posts: 88
Location: Central Kentucy: Where the Bluegrass Meets The Mountains

PostPosted: Sunday 5-31-2015 10:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Brandywine, which originated in Pennsylvania, just doesn't do well in the south. It's somewhat heat sensitive, and very humidity sensitive. But there are other pinks that do well and bring that depth of flavor Brandywine is known for. Brandt's Old German Pink, is one example.

I had actually co-founded, and for several years ran, the now defunct Appalachian Heirloom Seed Conservancy, whose function was the preservation of Appalachian varieties. Thus my continuing interest in those veggies.

If you're interested in heirlooms, you might want to make a note about the heirloom seed swap and get together in Berea, Kentucky, the first Saturday in October.

Bill Best, honcho of the Sustainable Mountain Agriculture Center, hosts the one-day event, which is a substitute for the three-day conferences AHSC used to hold. Serious heirlooms growers from seven or eight states make a point of attending each year, so you can imagine the depth of knowledge (not to mention the incredible number of heirloom seeds) available.
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Bigbamaboy



Joined: 28 May 2014
Posts: 102
Location: N.E. Alabama

PostPosted: Monday 6-1-2015 8:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

HF, thats cool stuff. I haven't ventured into heirloom stuff yet, although I did plant a good stand if heirloom okra my BinL's family has been raising for many years. Ill post up some pics of it when it matures. He doesn't even know what it is other than a very large podded, tall plant okra. Maybe you can help identify it.

I plan on letting several pods go to seed for myself. He saves about a 1/4 a gallon of seed every year and gives it to his parents and a few others.

I have 2 heirloom tomatoe plants my Mamaw gave me this year and she has one Israeli plant given to her by an old hat gardener here locally. She plans on keeping as many seeds as possible from it also. It has sparked an interest in the heirloom topic for me.
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HistoricFoodie



Joined: 18 Apr 2015
Posts: 88
Location: Central Kentucy: Where the Bluegrass Meets The Mountains

PostPosted: Monday 6-1-2015 12:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As you get into it, Bigbama, keep one thing in mind: It's just as important to preserve the stories behind the varieties as the varieties themselves. So record all the history and background you can about your accessions.

Soon as I have a moment to type it up I'll send you a PM with the whole story behind the Fife-Creek okra. It's long, and I don't want to bore other members.

Good luck with your seed collecting and preserving. If you need any how-to help, just ask. And, if I can make a recommendation, do pick up a copy of Susan Ashworth's "Seed To Seed." It's a must-have for anyone serious about seed saving.

Brook
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Bigbamaboy



Joined: 28 May 2014
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Location: N.E. Alabama

PostPosted: Monday 6-1-2015 3:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cool. Thanks. Thumbs Up
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Tom Kurth



Joined: 19 Nov 2007
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Location: Alma, Mo

PostPosted: Monday 6-1-2015 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

HF, a question for you: you seem familiar with the Brandywine strain. The ones I got this year (from a local greenhouse that grows their own) have really narrow leaves not like the normal potato leaves I'm used to seeing on Brandywines. Are there two Brandywines out there? Or did I get bogus Brandywines? Or are they maybe nutrient deprived? Any ideas? Thanks.
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HistoricFoodie



Joined: 18 Apr 2015
Posts: 88
Location: Central Kentucy: Where the Bluegrass Meets The Mountains

PostPosted: Monday 6-1-2015 4:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tom, the true Brandywine is a potato leaved, pink variety. Through the years, as Brandywine achieved more and more of an iconic stature, seed houses used the name on other varieties.

There are several strains, supposedly adapted to specialized conditions, such as heat and humidity. And there are now numerous colors, including a red, yellow, and black. Plus a Brandywine cherry.

It's a sad commentary. But nothing much can be done about it. "Brandywine" has become second only to "Amish" as used by seed house marketing people.

Another possibility is that the local nursery grew the bedding plants from seed it honestly acquired as Brandywine, but the seed house misled them. That, too, happens far too often, and is a growing problem as heirlooms become more and more mainstream.

So, while I don't know what you got locally, if it isn't potato leaf it's not the original Brandywine.

If you're interested in heirlooms, I would suggest joining the Seed Savers Exchange, in Decorah, IA. It's the largest seed-saving organization in the world. More importantly, it's members, through the annual yearbook, offer thousands of heirlooms. If it's a familiar one, such as Brandywine, you know you're getting the true gelt.
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Bigbamaboy



Joined: 28 May 2014
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Location: N.E. Alabama

PostPosted: Monday 6-1-2015 5:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

HF, what about rareseeds.com? Are they legit?
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