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How far along is your garden?
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Bigbamaboy



Joined: 28 May 2014
Posts: 102
Location: N.E. Alabama

PostPosted: Wednesday 5-13-2015 4:29 pm    Post subject: How far along is your garden? Reply with quote

I see nobody's posted here in a while, so I'll wake it up.

How far is your garden?

All my seeds have germinated except my okra and corn. They have only been in the ground since late last week. It has been unusually cool here in NE Alabama this year.

I have green beans, squash, zucchini, tomatoes, okra, corn, jalapeņos, cayenne, bell peppers, and cucumbers planted this year. Hopping for a bumper crop to feed my growing boys! Worship

I love to see those seedlings breaking ground. Thumbs Up
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David Hughes



Joined: 20 Jun 2010
Posts: 1356
Location: Middlefield, Ohio

PostPosted: Wednesday 5-13-2015 6:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well 90% of my garden is planted. Have spinach, radishes to eat. leaf lettuce coming up, peas coming up, beets and carrots coming up. Planted my tomatoes and peppers the other day, now there is a frost warning for tomorrow, so had to cover things up. Oh well that's North East Ohio. Have green onions to eat too.

Dave
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Bigwoods



Joined: 15 Nov 2007
Posts: 39
Location: Minnesota

PostPosted: Wednesday 5-13-2015 6:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Had snow two days ago so mine is still in the dreaming stage.. however the dandelions in the lawn are doing quite well. The good part is I haven't had to mow yet so looking forward to playing in the dirt. :Smile 1:
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DG TX



Joined: 21 Dec 2007
Posts: 1156
Location: Central Texas

PostPosted: Wednesday 5-13-2015 6:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For the first time in YEARS, we are having a wet spring. Nearly too wet! Frightened
My peppers and tomatoes are blooming and putting on a few young. Thumbs Up
Duke
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HistoricFoodie



Joined: 18 Apr 2015
Posts: 88
Location: Central Kentucy: Where the Bluegrass Meets The Mountains

PostPosted: Wednesday 5-13-2015 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Running kind of late, here, cuz we're opening a whole new garden on another property. Spring was so wet we couldn't get out there to even turn the ground.

Meanwhile, the greenhouse looks like a rain forest with seedlings of all kinds going wild.
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Brownie



Joined: 04 Nov 2014
Posts: 146
Location: NW Arizona

PostPosted: Wednesday 5-13-2015 7:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm in NW Arizona so my spinach, broccoli and kale are pretty much done. Onions are starting to go to seed. Lettuce is producing well.

Zuchini and squash should have something to eat this weekend. Tomatoes have some flowers but not a lot. It usually gets too hot here for tomatoes but come October I have more tomatoes than I can handle.

Green beans and melons are coming along but they have a ways to go yet.

Hollyhocks are gorgeous!!!
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Bigbamaboy



Joined: 28 May 2014
Posts: 102
Location: N.E. Alabama

PostPosted: Wednesday 5-13-2015 7:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Brownie, do you do raised bed?

It seems that it would be hard to raise veggies in that sandy, rocky soil there.
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Bigbamaboy



Joined: 28 May 2014
Posts: 102
Location: N.E. Alabama

PostPosted: Wednesday 5-13-2015 7:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ill be honest, I've had to restrain myself. I've changed jobs, and now I actually have time to maintain a garden. Between my neighbor and i, there is a 2 acre lot that he owns. He has grapevines and strawberries on part of it and the rest is tilled up to plant whatever. Part of it is in watermelons and cantaloupe, but he said to plant the remaining part in whatever I want. Baddd

I'm going to wait about 3 more weeks and plant another block of sweet corn and some pumpkins along with a fall garden of greens and winter squash.
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cliffmeister2000
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Joined: 21 Jan 2009
Posts: 3045
Location: Surprise (NorthWest of Phoenix) Arizona

PostPosted: Wednesday 5-13-2015 10:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bigbamaboy wrote:
Brownie, do you do raised bed?

It seems that it would be hard to raise veggies in that sandy, rocky soil there.


Don't know much about soil conditions in NW Arizona, but here in central Arizona I am surrounded by agriculture. Which amazes me, because I have only been successful at growing self stewing tomatoes! Frightened

Also, raised bed, it would seem to me, would allow the heat to get to the roots. The heat is already pretty hard on the plants with roots in the ground.
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Bigbamaboy



Joined: 28 May 2014
Posts: 102
Location: N.E. Alabama

PostPosted: Thursday 5-14-2015 6:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cliff, I read an article recently that stated raised bed gardens provided cooler soil temps in the late season so that you could plant cool weather veggies earlier.

Dont ask me how this works, or if its even true, bc i have zero raised bed experience.
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HistoricFoodie



Joined: 18 Apr 2015
Posts: 88
Location: Central Kentucy: Where the Bluegrass Meets The Mountains

PostPosted: Thursday 5-14-2015 7:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've never heard it phrased like that before, BigBama. But it stands to reason.

Raised beds have a lot of things going for them. But there are some negatives too. For one thing, they are more sensitive to ambient temperatures than the ground. Think in terms of roasting or baking in the oven; surrounding the dish with dry heat makes it heat faster and more evenly.

The other problem is that the soil in raised beds dries out more quickly (for the same reason). This, in turn, means more frequently watering; which, in turn, means the nutrients can leach out more quickly and have to be replaced either organically or with synthetic fertilizers.

Cliff: You might give shade cloth a try. Elevate it on poles directly over the plants.
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David Hughes



Joined: 20 Jun 2010
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Location: Middlefield, Ohio

PostPosted: Thursday 5-14-2015 11:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have raised beds, put them in last year for the first time, so far they are great. Mine are 10' long 4' wide and 12" deep. I have six frames made out of 2" X 12" ruff cut oak planks. I filled them with 50% 8 year old decayed horse manure two backs of peat moss and 50% top soil. I can plant things closer together and get much more produce in less space. Yes I do have to water more often but I like it. I stake my tomatoes and pinch the sucker off them. My son is going to build his this year the same as I did. Really like my garden this way. Had frost last night but had my tender plants covered. the garden looks great today. I have a section where I raise onions which produce year after year, part of the same frame I have horse radish and herbs.

Dave
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Brownie



Joined: 04 Nov 2014
Posts: 146
Location: NW Arizona

PostPosted: Thursday 5-14-2015 11:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, I use raised beds. The raised beds are a must not only because of our poor soil but it is much easier to protect my plants from rabbits, little ground critters, cats and birds. I make frames from PVC pipe and then drape bird netting over the entire bed. Works great and makes everything easy to get to.
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Bigbamaboy



Joined: 28 May 2014
Posts: 102
Location: N.E. Alabama

PostPosted: Thursday 5-14-2015 2:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have abound cube and a half of 8" block left over from building my house. I may experiment with some raised beds made out if that block. I'd love to do some carrots in a raised bed.
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Tom Kurth



Joined: 19 Nov 2007
Posts: 239
Location: Alma, Mo

PostPosted: Thursday 5-14-2015 3:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Eating radishes and leaf lettuce; spinach nearly ready. Tomatoes and peppers a little slow but I got ahead of the soil temp a little bit. Okra, cukes, cantaloupe, summer squash, dill and cilantro all planted. Only need to plant beans yet. To small of a garden for sweet corn.

I've been doing raised beds for years. Except for perennials I don't enclose the beds--makes it easier to turn over the soil in the spring. I'm basically organic, not because of my health reasons but for the soil itself and in the larger sense I think it's better for Mother. I've added enough organic matter and avoided compacting the soil over the years so that I no longer use a tiller--just turn over the soil with a potato fork each spring and start planting.

Best,
Tom
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