www.camp-cook.com Forum Index www.camp-cook.com
Home of the REAL iron chefs!
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
 Event CalendarEvent Calendar  email Joanneemail Joanne    T&TTTT&TTT    TearjerkersTearjerkers   How to Post PhotosHow To Post Photos

Bury my DO
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.camp-cook.com Forum Index -> Campfire Cooking
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
DOpig



Joined: 16 Aug 2008
Posts: 16
Location: Syracuse, west of the Mississippi

PostPosted: Wednesday 9-19-2012 9:45 am    Post subject: Bury my DO Reply with quote

Isn't there a method of cooking in which you bury your dutch oven in a hole and let it go for a good part of the day? Has anyone done this and will you share your tips for heat management and how to keep the dish dirt free?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
redheddedstranger



Joined: 19 Sep 2012
Posts: 58
Location: NC

PostPosted: Wednesday 9-19-2012 9:57 am    Post subject: Re: Bury my DO Reply with quote

DOpig wrote:
Isn't there a method of cooking in which you bury your dutch oven in a hole and let it go for a good part of the day? Has anyone done this and will you share your tips for heat management and how to keep the dish dirt free?


^ That is a first for me... does it have to do with a Dakota Fire hole?

http://survivaltopics.com/the-dakota-fire-hole/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Aggroman
Site Moderator


Joined: 01 Dec 2010
Posts: 1805
Location: On a river, somewhere in Texas

PostPosted: Wednesday 9-19-2012 10:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's weird. I read a story on Monday about this....and I can't find the site to save my life. But I will try to give a summery. This ladies granddad did all kinds of things, and at one point he was a sheepherder. (probably why I remembered the story, don't know a lot of sheepherders). Anyway, from what I can remember, he dug a hole and had a fire the night before in it. In the morning he would get the fire back up and going and put a roast(?)or maybe it was a stew and veggies in a dutch oven. He would keep coals on the bottom and top of the DO and then cover with dirt in the hole. He would then leave for the day and when he came back that evening he would dig it up and eat.

That was about as much as I can remember about the story. I'll see if I can locate it. I think the world could use a few more campfire cooking sheep herding stories. Gold Tooth Smile:

Scott
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Aggroman
Site Moderator


Joined: 01 Dec 2010
Posts: 1805
Location: On a river, somewhere in Texas

PostPosted: Wednesday 9-19-2012 10:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I did find this while on my search for the elusive sheepherding dutch oven guy.

HEATING

Although a Dutch oven can be hung over an open fire it can also be buried in a pit of coals. For hole in the ground cooking, dig a pit larger and deeper than the Dutch oven. Line it with small stones or you could even use aluminum foil to reflect the heat. Build your fire in the hole and burn down your charcoal til there are only hot coals. Remove some of the coals to later be placed on top. Put your oven in the hole and cover with dirt about 4- 6 inches thick. Add your remaining coals on top of the dirt to speed up your cooking time. Most dishes will require 4-6 hours of cooking in this method, but remember higher altitudes will require more cooking time.

Ralph Webb, a Western outdoorsman, used this method to cook several Thanksgiving turkeys one year. He cleaned out the inside of the uncooked bird and basted it inside and out with barbeque sauce. Several hours later the meat was falling off the bird and was the highlight of the feast.


http://www.essortment.com/cooking-dutch-oven-42199.html
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DOpig



Joined: 16 Aug 2008
Posts: 16
Location: Syracuse, west of the Mississippi

PostPosted: Wednesday 9-19-2012 12:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Aggroman! Just the info I needed and thanks for the link to the article. Going deer hunting in the Uinta mountains of Utah next week and thought I would give this a try. :Smile 1:
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
BIGDADDYBR549



Joined: 24 Jul 2009
Posts: 847
Location: Jackson TN

PostPosted: Wednesday 9-19-2012 1:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DOpig, Agrroman is on the money. I tried this several times with pots of baked beans and twice with pork roast. We dug about 2 feet deep and built a hardwood fire in the bottom. After it burnt to coals, we sat the camp oven on the coals, put a layer foil over the oven and put coals from our main campfire over and around it. I was about 8 inches below ground level at this point and we covered to the top with dirt. We left the camp and dug it up about 8 hours later. Some times it worked better than other but is a good way to not have to feed the fire all day. Make sure you have plenty of liquid in the oven to keep from burning during the first and hottest hours. Good luck on the hunt! PS putting a wire coat hangar on the oven bail helps you pull it out when it hot and can't find the handle in the dirt.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail AIM Address
Tom Kurth



Joined: 19 Nov 2007
Posts: 239
Location: Alma, Mo

PostPosted: Wednesday 9-19-2012 1:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sounds like a Missouri pig roast: prepare a thick bed of coals in a pit, cover with green corn husks, throw in the pig(s), more corn husks, cover with dirt, and wait twelve hours or so. Must have great quantities of beer on hand. I think the Texans do an imitaion of this with beef. Probably think they're being original.

Best,
Tom
_________________
Escape to Missouri
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Staci



Joined: 14 May 2012
Posts: 257
Location: Georgia/Florida

PostPosted: Wednesday 9-19-2012 2:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've cooked a few pigs in the ground but never my DO.

Try searching the internet for for Bean Hole Cooking - mostly refers to bean hole beans but you can find other in-the-ground recipes as well.

Check out the section "Cooking Meat"
http://www.cowboyshowcase.com/dutch_oven_cooking.htm#meat
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
bigfoote



Joined: 20 Nov 2010
Posts: 849
Location: West Jordan, Utah

PostPosted: Wednesday 9-19-2012 5:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My grandpa used to cook this way when he was a sheep herder. Check out my web site I described how he used to do it. I have done it a few times with good sucess.

Www.footefamilyoutdoorcooking.com


Last edited by bigfoote on Wednesday 9-19-2012 6:00 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
heycods



Joined: 23 Apr 2012
Posts: 309
Location: West Cent. Texas

PostPosted: Wednesday 9-19-2012 5:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tom Kurth wrote:
Sounds like a Missouri pig roast: prepare a thick bed of coals in a pit, cover with green corn husks, throw in the pig(s), more corn husks, cover with dirt, and wait twelve hours or so. Must have great quantities of beer on hand. I think the Texans do an imitaion of this with beef. Probably think they're being original.

Best,
Tom

Actually I think the Mexico Indians were doing that before Missouri had a population of 1 ! We learned it from the South of us not the North. They done it with deer, and still carries on with goats in the ground.
_________________
Have a good`un
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
Aggroman
Site Moderator


Joined: 01 Dec 2010
Posts: 1805
Location: On a river, somewhere in Texas

PostPosted: Wednesday 9-19-2012 6:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bigfoote8 wrote:
My grandpa used to cook this way when he was a sheep herder. Check out my web site I described how he used to do it. I have done it a few times with good sucess.

Www.footefamilyoutdoorcooking.com



THANK YOU Bigfoote8! I was scouring a ton of sites to find where I heard the story....and it was yours all along.lol. It was even in my bookmarks. Great story. I'd love to hear some more, I wasn't kidding about that. Around here it's cattle which i've herded my fair share. I don't know anything about sheepherding and the old ways of how that all worked. Probably very similar.

Scott
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
cliffmeister2000
Site Moderator


Joined: 21 Jan 2009
Posts: 3045
Location: Surprise (NorthWest of Phoenix) Arizona

PostPosted: Wednesday 9-19-2012 8:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had a Mexican neighbor once who always cooked a goat in the ground in his back yard on special occasions. To this day I wish I could get my hands on some of that goat meat! Cool
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
heycods



Joined: 23 Apr 2012
Posts: 309
Location: West Cent. Texas

PostPosted: Wednesday 9-19-2012 11:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cliffmeister2000 wrote:
I had a Mexican neighbor once who always cooked a goat in the ground in his back yard on special occasions. To this day I wish I could get my hands on some of that goat meat! Cool

Amazes me they can put 5# of Jap peppers in with that goat and it dont turn out hot! It is some scrumtious meat tho.
_________________
Have a good`un
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
DOpig



Joined: 16 Aug 2008
Posts: 16
Location: Syracuse, west of the Mississippi

PostPosted: Friday 9-21-2012 9:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks everyone for all the info. and encouragement. Thanks BIGDADDYBR549 for the tip about the clothes hanger.
Staci, that is a great web site. Thanks for the link.
3 more days and I'm out of here!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
bigfoote



Joined: 20 Nov 2010
Posts: 849
Location: West Jordan, Utah

PostPosted: Sunday 9-23-2012 3:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

heycods wrote:
Tom Kurth wrote:
Sounds like a Missouri pig roast: prepare a thick bed of coals in a pit, cover with green corn husks, throw in the pig(s), more corn husks, cover with dirt, and wait twelve hours or so. Must have great quantities of beer on hand. I think the Texans do an imitaion of this with beef. Probably think they're being original.

Best,
Tom

Actually I think the Mexico Indians were doing that before Missouri had a population of 1 ! We learned it from the South of us not the North. They done it with deer, and still carries on with goats in the ground.



My Grandpa was raising his Family in the great depression. Work was hard to find. One of the jobs he had was a sheepherder. While herding sheep he didn't have the time for cooking so he used the method the our pioneers did. He would dig a hole 2 1/2 times as deep as his Dutch oven, and twice as wide. The evenings is when had extra time. So he would build a good sized fire and keep it burning through the night, then he would add more wood to the fire in the morning and let it die down. Then he would use his shovel to remove most of the hot coals, then he would place his Dutch oven in the hole on top of a small bed of hot coal, then he would add some dirt and more hot coal, he would repeat this process until the Dutch oven was completely buried, then he would place the rest of the hot coals on top to help keep the ground warm. Then he would go off and tend his sheep. His job was to protect the sheep from wild animals and keep them from straying off. I remember and a young lad going with my Grandpa to feed his sheep, we drive up in his truck he would honk the horn and get out a bucket of feed, then well yell come and get it, and his sheep would come running for to grain. It was amazing to watch. And in the winter he would bring his sheep in from his land, he had a small one acre piece of land in town where would range his sheep during the winter months. It was amazing to see him bring those sheep to his home. He did not heard them in they followed him, while driving his truck slowly. He truly love he animals that he raised.

He also carried a sourdough start, He would mix his biscuits in a sack of flour, because he did not have the means of doing dishes.

I remember visiting with him on many of occasions, and he would hear someone say back in the good old days thing only cost 1/2 what they were then. He would turn to them and say those were not the good old days, you could keep your family feed, and clothed. He only made 35 cents a day. Work was hard to find. When you needed something like shoes you were not allowed to buy shoe unless you had a issued ticket to do so. And you only got one pair of shoes every 3 months. They had a hard life but were grateful for what they had.

I hope that I didn't ramble on to much!
Richard


Last edited by bigfoote on Sunday 9-23-2012 9:06 am; edited 2 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.camp-cook.com Forum Index -> Campfire Cooking All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group